Showing Posts From: Feminism

23 Jan, 2017

Women’s March Knoxville

/ posted in: Current EventsFeminismSigns and Wonders

I was in Knoxville TN over the weekend and decided to hit up the Women’s March there. I’m so glad I did.

I made a little video from my pictures and video

I loved the Indian girl at the end of the video. She was so excited because the crowd behind us had started chanting “Love Trumps Hate”. I told her it was because of her sign. She was walking beside me for a while chanting “Love Trumps Hate” in this little tiny voice. She was adorable!

It was raining so eventually my signs melted.  But lots of people came up to me to take pictures of them.  A physics professor from the University of Tennessee hugged me and got his son to take pictures of us together.

East Tennessee is a very conservative area so it was great to see this turnout.  Part of me just wanted to yell though, “We wouldn’t be here if some of ya’ll hadn’t voted for him in the first place.” but I held my tongue.

Did anyone else march anywhere?

 

14 Oct, 2015

Women on Wednesday #6

/ posted in: FeminismWomen on Wednesday

For those of us who follow a lot of news about women, it can seem like a never ending list of gloom and doom.  Sometimes we need to remember that women are doing great things!  That’s the idea behind this new feature.

Every Wednesday I’ll feature some news, articles, and blog posts that are positive about women.  To do this I need your help too.  Link up posts that you have about women.  It could be reviews of a book with a female author, a discussion on a news article you saw, a blog post about important women now or in history, or anything else to show the world that we are able to lift up and support each other.

I’ll be featuring some of the linked up posts the next week, pinning all of the posts to the Women on Wednesday Pinterest board, and spreading the love for our links on Twitter.


 

Around the Internet

Interview: April Genevieve Tucholke on Slasher Girls & Monster Boys, Women in Horror

“I love that the focus is shifting from the idea of these women as scream queens running away from men.”

 
Malala’s mother has gone back to school to learn to read and write

Speaking through an interpreter, she told a cheering audience that she left school at a young age when she found herself the only girl in the classroom, but that she is now happy and proud to be learning to read and write, and is learning English too.

Book Recommendations

52 Women who changed science
 

 
Canadian women of color author recommendations


 

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07 Oct, 2015

Women on Wednesday #5

/ posted in: FeminismWomen on Wednesday

For those of us who follow a lot of news about women, it can seem like a never ending list of gloom and doom.  Sometimes we need to remember that women are doing great things!  That’s the idea behind this new feature.

Every Wednesday I’ll feature some news, articles, and blog posts that are positive about women.  To do this I need your help too.  Link up posts that you have about women.  It could be reviews of a book with a female author, a discussion on a news article you saw, a blog post about important women now or in history, or anything else to show the world that we are able to lift up and support each other.

I’ll be featuring some of the linked up posts the next week, pinning all of the posts to the Women on Wednesday Pinterest board, and spreading the love for our links on Twitter.


 

Around the Internet

Dr. Tu Youyou wins a Nobel Prize for developing new treatments for malaria by studying old Chinese medicine texts.  I love this story because I’ve studied some Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Female leaders gather to underline importance of educating girls

 

Female Authors and Characters You Should Read

Book Punks reviews Nnedi Okorafor’s Book of Phoenix
Emily reviews Out of Sight, Out of Time by Ally Carter

Hannah writes about her love for Anne of Green Gables and what she’s learned about the author.

Your guide to the greatest heroines of young adult fiction


 

Based On A True Story

 

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30 Sep, 2015

Women on Wednesday #4

/ posted in: FeminismWomen on Wednesday

For those of us who follow a lot of news about women, it can seem like a never ending list of gloom and doom.  Sometimes we need to remember that women are doing great things!  That’s the idea behind this new feature.

Every Wednesday I’ll feature some news, articles, and blog posts that are positive about women.  To do this I need your help too.  Link up posts that you have about women.  It could be reviews of a book with a female author, a discussion on a news article you saw, a blog post about important women now or in history, or anything else to show the world that we are able to lift up and support each other.

I’ll be featuring some of the linked up posts the next week, pinning all of the posts to the Women on Wednesday Pinterest board, and spreading the love for our links on Twitter.


Last Week on the Link Up

Marissa shared her review of The Young Elites

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Around the Internet

School Girl Develops New Ebola Test

“16-year-old Olivia Hallisey is destined for great things. She’s currently a student at Greenwich High School in Connecticut, where her interest in science led her to develop a new test for detecting the Ebola virus. Olivia’s work is now being recognized all over the country, because last week she won the prestigious Grand Prize and a $50,000 college scholarship at the Google Science Fair.”

The Tajik Women Rejecting Local Taboos – On Their Bikes

“Like anywhere else in the region, cycling has been around for decades, but in rural areas the activity has traditionally been primarily used for work, not pleasure, and definitely not for women.”

20 Years After Beijing How Are We Doing?

“Twenty years ago, at the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, 189 nations agreed to an ambitious Platform for Action that called for the “full and equal participation of women in political, civil, economic, social and cultural life.” It was at this conference that Hillary Clinton famously declared that “women’s rights are human rights.”

 

Not A Good Enough Feminist

“If I’m being completely honest, though, I think the lack of feminism on this blog has less to do with an inability to write thoughtfully on the subject and more with an insecurity regarding my own status as a feminist.”

 

 


 

Based On A True Story

 

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23 Sep, 2015

Women on Wednesday #3

/ posted in: FeminismWomen on Wednesday

For those of us who follow a lot of news about women, it can seem like a never ending list of gloom and doom.  Sometimes we need to remember that women are doing great things!  That’s the idea behind this new feature.

Every Wednesday I’ll feature some news, articles, and blog posts that are positive about women.  To do this I need your help too.  Link up posts that you have about women.  It could be reviews of a book with a female author, a discussion on a news article you saw, a blog post about important women now or in history, or anything else to show the world that we are able to lift up and support each other.

I’ll be featuring some of the linked up posts the next week, pinning all of the posts to the Women on Wednesday Pinterest board, and spreading the love for our links on Twitter.


 

Around the Internet


The 104-Year-Old Street Artist Who Yarn Bombed Her Town

“Grace Brett might be the oldest living street artist in the world. The 104-year-old grandmother of six is a member of a knitting club known as the “Souter Stormers,” who recently yarn-bombed the towns of Selkirk, Ettrickbridge, and Yarrow in Scotland.”

Drive for women’s empowerment: Mumbai’s all female taxi firm

“The all-female Priyardarshini Taxi Service was set up in Mumbai in 2008 by the social entrepreneur Susieben Shah, who wanted to support women’s economic empowerment in India.”

#SmartGirlsAsk Challenges Red-Carpet Sexism at Emmys

“Are you tired of sexist interview questions? It’s an irritating, yet persistent habit of Hollywood to give male actors interesting and relevant questions while women are asked about their makeup and dietary choices. Amy Poehler’s #SmartGirlsAsk campaign asked Twitter for some thoughtful questions, and brought them to the Emmy awards.”

Women Sweep 2015 Ignatz Awards at This Year’s Small Press Expo

“How rad is this: this year’s Ignatz Awards were swept by female creators in every category. For those of you who don’t know, the Ignatz Awards are awards given to comics creators in recognition of their achievements within small press or creator owned comics”



 

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16 Sep, 2015

Women on Wednesday #2

/ posted in: FeminismWomen on Wednesday

For those of us who follow a lot of news about women, it can seem like a never ending list of gloom and doom.  Sometimes we need to remember that women are doing great things!  That’s the idea behind this new feature.

Every Wednesday I’ll feature some news, articles, and blog posts that are positive about women.  To do this I need your help too.  Link up posts that you have about women.  It could be reviews of a book with a female author, a discussion on a news article you saw, a blog post about important women now or in history, or anything else to show the world that we are able to lift up and support each other.

I’ll be featuring some of the linked up posts the next week, pinning all of the posts to the Women on Wednesday Pinterest board, and spreading the love for our links on Twitter.


 

Around the Internet

Ripped Goddess – This is a Facebook group for women who exercise.  It is about celebrating the body that you are in.

When Teaching Your Daughters about Gender Equality is No Longer Enough (Guest Post by Benjamin L. Corey)

“I’ve learned my lesson on the dangers of going to a church that doesn’t affirm equality of women. Instead of dismissing it as a “disputable matter” in an attempt to keep a faux version of peace, I now know this isn’t a disputable matter at all—not for me. Not for my family.”

This is a great post on ways that men can support equality for women.

Maasai women are the new solar warriors of Africa


 

From Buzzfeed

 

 

 

 

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09 Sep, 2015

Women on Wednesday #1

/ posted in: FeminismWomen on Wednesday

For those of us who follow a lot of news about women, it can seem like a never ending list of gloom and doom.  Sometimes we need to remember that women are doing great things!  That’s the idea behind this new feature.

Every Wednesday I’ll feature some news, articles, and blog posts that are positive about women.  To do this I need your help too.  Link up posts that you have about women.  It could be reviews of a book with a female author, a discussion on a news article you saw, a blog post about important women now or in history, or anything else to show the world that we are able to lift up and support each other.

I’ll be featuring some of the linked up posts the next week, pinning all of the posts to the Women on Wednesday Pinterest board, and spreading the love for our links on Twitter.


 

Around the Internet

Belle Britta on Feminism for the Win!

Over at The Mary Sue:

Librarian cruises San Francisco aboard her bicycle library

History Professor Denies Native Genocide: Native Student Disagreed, Then Says Professor Expelled Her From Course – What I like about this story is that the student didn’t just go off on a rant.  She went home, did her research, came back armed with facts, and then made her point.

Over at A Mighty Girl read about 13 Books About Women and the Labor Movement for kids.

Watch: Carey Mulligan & Meryl Streep Fight For Equality In The New U.K. Trailer For ‘Suffragette’

 

 

 

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18 Mar, 2015

Standing Up For Women’s Rights in Africa

/ posted in: Current EventsFeminism

It has been a while since I’ve gone off on a rant here but they pushed me over the edge.

My particular form of masochism involves reading some anti-feminist websites once a week. This week I followed a link to an article by R.C.Sproul Jr. You can read the whole thing here. The site doesn’t allow comments so I have to vent here.

A woman named Rachel Marie Stone wrote an article on Christianity Today that talked about a woman who works in a hospital in Malawi who praised Margaret Sanger. The article then goes on to discuss how the author felt uncomfortable with that because of Sanger’s association with eugenics. However, in this hospital in Africa there was overwhelming evidence that birth control is needed. Read the article here.

My first thought was, “You go girl!” for writing a pro-contraception piece on Christianity Today. That was not the overwhelming feeling.

Sproul:

“Rose Marie Stone stepped in it recently when she, a blogger carried by Christianity Today, wrote a brief piece in praise of contraception. That, of course, won’t get you in much trouble with many audiences. The deeper problem was that in making her case, she held up Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood, as something of a hero, however wrong she might have been in eugenics. This was, in a manner of speaking, a social faux pas, a rhetorical fail, on par with observing that while Hitler had his issues, at least he got the trains to run on time.”

Wow. That’s not exactly an equal comparison.

“Ms. Stone highlighted a long list of hardships that could have been avoided had some children been avoided – mothers dying in childbirth, children laboring in difficult conditions and for long hours, sundry illnesses suffered by children and mothers in third world contexts. How wonderful, the argument goes, it would have been if the blessing of contraception could have kept these hardships at bay. Trouble is, contraception wipes out the hardships by wiping out the babies. It’s as if terrible weather came together with terrible car designs, in conjunction with terrible road design, and government subsidies for driving drunk to create a perfect storm that leads to a 100 car pile up with dozens dead and scores injured. And our solution would be to get rid of the people. If only they had never been born. That would have solved this problem.”

I have reread that analogy so many times and I can’t make it work. I read it to other people in case I was missing something. No one found it enlightening.

Here’s what she actually said about “hardships” after listing off numbers about the number of deaths that may be prevented from spacing births and from women not having babies until fully mature.

As I walked the halls of Zomba Central Hospital, I saw hugely pregnant girls of 12 or 13 years of age. I saw women with untreated tuberculosis and HIV pregnant for the fifth, sixth, or seventh time. I saw babies born too soon due to their mothers’ overwork and malnutrition; babies going blind from their mothers’ untreated venereal disease. I saw hungry children in rural villages; five-year old girls carrying water jugs on their heads and baby siblings on their backs while their heavily pregnant mothers gathered firewood or hoed the maize.

I’d maybe go more for “tragedies” instead of “hardships.” Notice who aren’t being inconvenienced in this list.

Now it is time for my all time favorite line from the Sproul piece.

“But I can’t help but notice that it is always the living who wish others had never been born.”

As my coworker said, “Yep, zombies don’t care one bit!

He finishes by saying that he wants “a good life.”

I think that is probably the goal for the women and children helped by this African hospital too.

Go to the article on Christianity Today and add some comments if you support her ideas.  The comments are overwhelming anti-woman and anti-science.

23 Feb, 2015

Freedom’s Daughters by Lynne Olson

/ posted in: Current EventsFeminismReading Freedom’s Daughters by Lynne Olson Freedom's Daughters by Lynne Olson
on 2001
Pages: 460
Genres: 20th Century, Civil Rights, History, Nonfiction, Political Science, Social Science, United States, Women's Studies
Published by Simon and Schuster
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Buy on Amazon (affiliate link)

The first comprehensive history of the role of women in the civil rights movement, Freedom's Daughters fills a startling gap in both the literature of civil rights and of women's history. Stokely Carmichael, Andrew Young, John Lewis, and other well-known leaders of the civil rights movement have admitted that women often had the ideas for which men took credit. In this groundbreaking book, credit finally goes where credit is due -- to the bold women who were crucial to the movement's success and who refused to give up the fight.

Goodreads

I found this book because I wanted to find out more about Diane Nash, who was featured in the movie Selma.

The book starts with Ida B. Wells who was a journalist in the 1800s reporting on lynching.

After the Civil War, black women were able to apply their educations in jobs such as teaching more readily than black men were allowed.  These educated women organized social services and groups to fight against injustice.  The backlash came swiftly.  Black pastors accused them of being too powerful and taking on roles that should be filled by men.  The sexism grew.

“Once male slaves were freed, they sought to claim what they saw as those rights of ownership, particularly control over black women to which white men had previously laid claim.” pg 44

It was women who kept pressing for more rights during the early 1900s. Pauli Murray and Eleanor Roosevelt were featured among others.

A recurring theme is that women would start a project and then when it was getting successful, men would come in and take over.

“News coverage, which the leaders sought, was, as Murray pointed out, a matter of men reporting on men.  Stories on the movement often read like accounts of sports contests or wars, keeping score of who was up and who was down, who won an dwho lost.  Conflict was always emphasized, whether between civil rights organizations or between local white aurthorities and activitis.  The behind-the-scenes activity that women specialized in – organizing, building consensus, sustaining a  sense of community – did not make good television, nor did it lend itself to dramatic newspaper or magazine headlines. page 235

During the 1960s black and white women worked together in most of the major campaigns. Opposition to Civil Rights was often because of fears of black men sleeping with white women. For this reason, white women were often kept in the office and not allowed to go out into the field with black men. They started to chafe under the restrictions of their “women’s work.” Black women often did not see their point about sexism because they didn’t have the same prohibitions. This led to splits in organizations and several of the white women who had been very involved in the Civil Rights movement started working with feminist organizations. This disconnect between black and white women over sexism can still be seen in discussions today around race and feminism.

I learned about women that I didn’t know anything about previously, including Diane Nash. She was incredible!

This book was a good compliment to the Rosa Parks biography I read. I’d recommend this for anyone interested in women’s history that they may not have heard before.

11 Jan, 2015

This Common Secret by Susan Wickland

/ posted in: FeminismReading

In 1976 Susan Wickland had an abortion.  The doctor and staff that did the abortion were very rough with her and she was disgusted at the way she was treated.  Afterwards she became interested in reproductive health and worked with women giving birth.  A chance encounter with a career counselor at a party put the idea of becoming a doctor into her mind.

She entered college as the single mother of a toddler.  After finishing medical school, she wanted to provide abortions in a supportive environment like she wished that she would have had during her abortion.

She started providing abortions during the 1980s when anti-abortion protesters were at their most aggressive.  She was beaten and chased and routinely was threatened.  Crowds of protesters met her at airports and blocked the entrance to her driveway to try to keep her from being able to leave her house.  She had to don disguises to be able to get into clinics where she was scheduled to work.

Through it all, she kept going for the women for whom she was providing service.  She tells the story of many of them and what led them to seek out an abortion.  She talks about women who she encouraged not to have an abortion.  She talks about the anti-abortion protesters who came to her for abortions.

It was a hard life.  She had to vary her route to and from clinics.  She had to sneak through the woods at night to get away from protesters in her driveway. Her daughter was targeted at school.  When doctors started being killed, she started to wear a gun.

No matter how you feel about abortion, this is a story from a point of view that hasn’t been told.

 

feminismreadingchallenge

Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

 

08 Jan, 2015

Favorite Feminist Reading

/ posted in: FeminismReading

The theme for The F Word this month is your feminist book/film/music/site recommendations.  Whenever I think of feminist book recommendations I always think of Sherri S. Tepper first.

She is the author of many sci-fi/fantasy books always featuring a feminist perspective.  Her books also discuss ecology and a distaste for fundamentalist religion.

She was born in Colorado in 1929 and worked for many years with Planned Parenthood.  Go read the biography on her website.  It is amazing.

The book of hers that I recommend most is The Fresco.

The FrescoThe Fresco by Sheri S. Tepper

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Benita Alvarez-Shipton is a 36 year old bookstore employee in an abusive marriage when she is approached by two aliens to deliver the news of humanity’s first contact with extraterrestrial life to the proper authorities.  Earth has been noticed by many alien races. The Pistach are envoys from a peaceful confederacy who want to get Earth under their protection before others decide to hunt on it.  In order to join though, humans are going to have to agree to adopt Neighborliness, the confederacy’s governing principle.  There can be no more racial strife or sexism or hurting the planet.  If you can’t get along on your own planet, how will you get along with others?  The Pistach realize that this will be hard for some humans so they are prepared to help.  It is for our own good.

There are two main stories told in the book in alternating chapters.  The first is Benita’s story.  She was chosen because she was ordinary but for the same reason, no one will believe her even though she has proof.  In order to be an effective ambassador she has to decide to stand up for herself against her abusive husband and her college-aged son who has been trained by his father to look down on her.  This is the story that I love the most.  It is profound and hilarious. As the aliens decide to “fix” Earth, panic ensues.  I love their fixes and wish they could happen.  For example, at one point the mediators for the confederacy are going to have to leave because it is time to lay their eggs.  Because it is a delicate time in the talks, they decide instead to forcibly impregnate certain men who have publicly said that no one should be able to have an abortion in case of rape because all life is precious.  They figure that these men will cherish the mediators’ unborn larvae and be grateful for the opportunity to host them.

The other story is the story of the Pistach.  They are a race that has a long tradition of reaching out to other races in peace.  This tradition is based on their religion which is recorded on a fresco.  The fresco is very old and so dirty that it can’t be seen well.  It is considered too holy and important to risk cleaning.  There is a commentary that explains each of the panels and why it is so important that the Pistach always choose peace.  Now a rebel faction have captured the fresco building and are going to clean it to see what the fresco really shows.  If the fresco isn’t the message of peace that they’ve been taught it is, what does that mean for Pistach culture and the negotiations currently underway on Earth?

Because I think every one should try her books, I’m giving away a copy of The Fresco.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

feminismreadingchallenge

18 Dec, 2014

If Nuns Ruled The World by Jo Piazza

/ posted in: FeminismReading

If your mental picture of nuns is straight from The Sound of Music, you should read this book.  The ten women profiled are each showing how women can dedicate themselves to improving the lives of the people around them.

There are nuns profiled here who have been jailed for civil disobedience.  They have protected women at abortion clinics.  They have cared for children born in prisons and women rescued from sex trafficking.  They have fought the church to include gay and lesbian people and to increase the opportunities for women.  They have been tortured for working in Central America and now work with other victims of torture.

Each of these women will challenge you to change the world around you.

10 Dec, 2014

The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore

/ posted in: FeminismReading

Wonder Woman was created in 1941 and was the brainchild of William Moulton Marston. Marston was a brilliant but arrogant man. He worked his way through Harvard in the early 1910s by writing screenplays for the fledgling movie industry. During his junior year in the psychology department he invented the first lie-detector test. He was a supporter of the suffragette movement that was electrifying Harvard. During his freshman year, leading British suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst was banned from speaking on campus. Harvard didn’t let women speak in their lecture halls.

He married his childhood sweetheart, Sadie Elizabeth Holloway, after graduation. She was a graduate of Mount Holyoke College and an ardent feminist. She even had the bobbed hair to prove it! Because Marston was going to Harvard Law, she decided to go too. She wasn’t admitted because she was a woman so she went to Boston College Law, where she excelled.

Olive Byrne was the niece of Margaret Sanger and the daughter of Ethel Byrne, the founders of the first birth control clinic in the United States.  She met Marston when she was student in one of his classes.  He brought her home to live with him and his wife.  Sadie Holloway worked to support the family because Marston couldn’t hold a steady job.  Olive Byrne raised the children.  Each woman had two children with Marston.  There was also another woman who came and went often through the years.

I don’t like polygamist stories because there is such an awkward power dynamic.  I felt like Holloway was forced into this arrangement.  But then after Marston died the women stayed together for another 45 years.

Wonder Woman was designed to be a feminist story.  It was based on a book called  Woman and the New Race by Margaret Sanger and Marston’s theory that women should control the world through loving submission.  In Marston’s Wonder Woman stories bondage is a constant theme and started to cause trouble with critics.  When other writers worked on Wonder Woman they relegated her to more traditional female duties like being the secretary of the Justice League.  After Marston’s death Holloway asked to take over the writing to keep her steeped in feminist principles but control of the comic was given to male writers who didn’t agree with women’s independence.

I didn’t know anything about the 1940s comic version of Wonder Woman.  I was a big fan of the 1970s TV show though.

This book is much more about the history of the family than the history of Wonder Woman. Olive Byrne was adamant that no one ever know the truth about their family arrangements. She never even admitted to her children that Marston was their father. Likewise no one involved ever discussed the link between Margaret Sanger and the feminist movement and Wonder Woman. Olive Byrne was interviewed extensively about her mother and aunt after their deaths but no interviewer ever caught on to the fact that she had a pretty amazing story too.

Listening to this book made me want to read more about the feminist movement in the early 20th century. The author read the book and that distracted a bit. She wasn’t great at doing voices. It would have been better to read it without them.

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