Central and South American Books

/ posted in: Reading

Whenever I look back at where I’ve been reading in a year, Central and South America always seem to be left out. This year I made a bigger effort to find some books from this region. When I went back to make this list though, I realized that I had read more books set in Mexico and further south than I realized.

Mexico

Becoming Naomi LeonBecoming Naomi Leon by Pam Muñoz Ryan

“Naomi Soledad León Outlaw has had a lot to contend with in her young life, her name for one. Then there are her clothes (sewn in polyester by Gram), her difficulty speaking up, & her status at school as “nobody special.” But according to Gram’s self-prophecies, most problems can be overcome with positive thinking. Luckily, Naomi also has her carving to strengthen her spirit. And life with Gram & her little brother, Owen, is happy & peaceful. That is, until their mother reappears after 7 years of being gone, stirring up all sorts of questions & challenging Naomi to discover who she really is.”

This is a MG book that takes place in California and in Oaxaca for the radish carving festival.

Santa Muerte (The Daniela Story #1)Santa Muerte by Lucina Stone

“Lucina Stone blends Mexican folklore with modern technology and time travel in this seductive new series where the lines between right and wrong, protagonist and antagonist, truth and fiction, love and lust, and life and death have never been more blurred.”

This is a witchy, time-travel book that starts in the United States but the key to the mystery is going to be found in the Yucatan.

 

My (Underground) American Dream: My True Story as an Undocumented Immigrant Who Became a Wall Street ExecutiveMy (Underground) American Dream: My True Story as an Undocumented Immigrant Who Became a Wall Street Executive by Julissa Arce

“When she was 11 years old Julissa Arce left Mexico and came to the United States on a tourist visa to be reunited with her parents, who dreamed the journey would secure her a better life. When her visa expired at the age of 15, she became an undocumented immigrant. Thus began her underground existence, a decades long game of cat and mouse, tremendous family sacrifice, and fear of exposure. After the Texas Dream Act made a college degree possible, Julissa’s top grades and leadership positions landed her an internship at Goldman Sachs, which led to a full time position–one of the most coveted jobs on Wall Street. Soon she was a Vice President, a rare Hispanic woman in a sea of suits and ties, yet still guarding her “underground” secret.”


Guatemala

The Polish BoxerThe Polish Boxer by Eduardo Halfon

“The Polish Boxer covers a vast landscape of human experience while enfolding a search for origins: a grandson tries to make sense of his Polish grandfather’s past and the story behind his numbered tattoo; a Serbian classical pianist longs for his forbidden heritage; a Mayan poet is torn between his studies and filial obligations; a striking young Israeli woman seeks answers in Central America; a university professor yearns for knowledge that he can’t find in books and discovers something unexpected at a Mark Twain conference. Drawn to what lies beyond the range of reason, they all reach for the beautiful and fleeting, whether through humor, music, poetry, or unspoken words. Across his encounters with each of them, the narrator—a Guatemalan literature professor and writer named Eduardo Halfon—pursues his most enigmatic subject: himself.”

Despite the title this takes place mainly in Guatemala, with a trip to Europe.


Bolivia

Marching Powder: A True Story of Friendship, Cocaine, and South America's Strangest JailMarching Powder: A True Story of Friendship, Cocaine, and South America’s Strangest Jail by Rusty Young

“Rusty Young was backpacking in South America when he heard about Thomas McFadden, a convicted English drug trafficker who ran tours inside Bolivia’s notorious San Pedro prison. Intrigued, the young Australian journalisted went to La Paz and joined one of Thomas’s illegal tours. They formed an instant friendship and then became partners in an attempt to record Thomas’s experiences in the jail. Rusty bribed the guards to allow him to stay and for the next three months he lived inside the prison, sharing a cell with Thomas and recording one of the strangest and most compelling prison stories of all time.”

I stayed in Eastern Bolivia for 5 weeks in vet school so I am always looking for more books about Bolivia. This takes place in La Paz which is a whole different universe from Eastern Bolivia but I take what I can get. This was fascinating.


Brazil

Brazillionaires: Chasing Dreams of Wealth in an American CountryBrazillionaires: Chasing Dreams of Wealth in an American Country by Alex Cuadros

“When Bloomberg News invited the young American journalist Alex Cuadros to report on Brazil’s emerging class of billionaires at the height of the historic Brazilian boom, he was poised to cover two of the biggest business stories of our time: how the giants of the developing world were triumphantly taking their place at the center of global capitalism, and how wealth inequality was changing societies everywhere. Eike Batista, a flamboyant and charismatic evangelist for the country’s new gospel of wealth, epitomized much of this rarefied sphere: In 2012, Batista ranked as the eighth-richest person in the world, was famous for his marriage to a beauty queen, and was a fixture in the Brazilian press. His constantly repeated ambition was to become the world’s richest man and to bring Brazil along with him to the top. But by 2015, Batista was bankrupt, his son Thor had been indicted for manslaughter, and Brazil its president facing impeachment, its provinces combating an epidemic, and its business and political class torn apart by scandal had become a cautionary tale of a country run aground by its elites, a tale with ominous echoes around the world.”


All Over

The Wonder Trail: True Stories from Los Angeles to the End of the WorldThe Wonder Trail: True Stories from Los Angeles to the End of the World by Steve Hely

“The Wonder Trail is the story of Steve’s trip from Los Angeles to the bottom of South America, presented in 102 short chapters. The trip was ambitious – Steve traveled through Mexico City, ancient Mayan ruins, the jungles and coffee plantations and remote beaches of Central America, across the Panama Canal, by sea to Colombia, to the wild Easter celebration of Popayán, to the Amazon rainforest, the Inca sites of Cuzco and Machu Picchu, to the Galápagos Islands, the Atacama Desert of Chile, and down to the jagged and wind-worn land of Patagonia at the very end of the Western Hemisphere.”

This book gave a lot of other book recommendations. It is how I heard of Marching Powder. I was listening to it so I couldn’t go back and get all the recs though.