Nonfiction November Week 4

/ posted in: Reading

New to My TBR: It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book!

I’ve had a lot of fun with Nonfiction November.

Currently listening to:

Everyday SexismEveryday Sexism by Laura Bates

In 2012 after being sexually harassed on London public transport Laura Bates, a young journalist, started a project called Everyday Sexism to collect stories for a piece she was writing on the issue. Astounded by the response she received and the wide range of stories that came pouring in from all over the world, she quickly realised that the situation was far worse than she’d initially thought.” Goodreads

 

Currently reading:

The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern WorldThe Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic–and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson
Trust Steven Johnson to put an intriguing and unconventional spin on a well-known story! The nimble-minded nonfiction writer who dazzled us in Emergence, Mind Wide Open, and Everything Bad Is Good for You now parses a storied incident from the annals of public health– the Broad Street cholera epidemic of 1854, a deadly outbreak that decimated London’s population in eight days.

At the center of the story stand two heroic figures: Reverend Henry Whitehead and Dr. John Snow, whose combined efforts in mapping the disease solved the mystery of how cholera spreads and created a model of information design with wide-ranging implications. Using historical narrative as a scaffolding for some of his famously big ideas, Johnson shows how this story from Victorian times offers lessons for modern cities facing a host of problems–from urban sprawl to environmental crises and the threat of bio-terrorism.”  Goodreads

 

The Dirt on Clean: An Unsanitized HistoryThe Dirt on Clean: An Unsanitized History by Katherine Ashenburg

 

The apparently routine task of taking up soap and water (or not) is Katherine Ashenburg’s starting point for a unique exploration of Western culture, which yields surprising insights into our notions of privacy, health, individuality, religion and sexuality.” Goodreads

 

 

Added to my TBR list from posts this month:

This isn’t even close to all the books I’ve added but you get the idea.  I don’t remember who posted what books because I’ve read so many blogs this month.

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North AmericaThe Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King

 

 

 


 

A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in AmericaA Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in America by Allyson Hobbs

 

 

 


 

I'm Off Then: Losing and Finding Myself on the Camino de SantiagoI’m Off Then: Losing and Finding Myself on the Camino de Santiago by Hape Kerkeling

 

 

 


 

Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much MoreRedefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More by Janet Mock

This was from a Become an Expert post on transexual identity.

 

 

 


Atheist Awakening: Secular Activism and Community in AmericaAtheist Awakening: Secular Activism and Community in America by Richard Cimino

 

 

 

 


The Empathy Exams: EssaysThe Empathy Exams: Essays by Leslie Jamison