Sunday Week in Review

/ posted in: Reading

Books Posted This Week

Fairest by Marissa Meyer – See the series from the evil Queen Levana’s point of view

The Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King – Essays on what it means to be Native American in North America

Harry Potter World pictures

Received This Week

 

I received this Valentine’s Day package from Lost in Literature. Thanks!

Coming Up This Week

 

African American Read-a-thon

“There’s no minimum or maximum to read here. This should be fun! Up for reading are any books authored by people of African heritage/decent. This includes African American authors and other who may identify as being Black without being American. All genres count! YA, MG, Adult, Fiction, Nonfiction, etc.” from Becoming Books

I’m hopefully going to be reviewing three books during this time.  Or, reviewing two and finishing the last one.  You know how it is.

The Book Bloggers Love-a-Thon

“The Book Blogger Love-a-Thon is an event dedicated to spreading the love for blogs + bloggers! It’s time dedicated to exploring the blogging community, leaving a comment or two, meeting new friends and fostering positivity among the bloggers of the community. The event includes an introduction post, mini challenges, Twitter chats and a giveaway! The full schedule will be sent to the participants after they sign up.”

Sign up here.


 Listening To This Week

The Witch With No Name (The Hollows, #13)The Witch With No Name by Kim Harrison

Rachel Morgan’s come a long way from the clutzy runner of Dead Witch Walking. She’s faced vampires and werewolves, banshees, witches, and soul-eating demons. She’s crossed worlds, channeled gods, and accepted her place as a day-walking demon. She’s lost friends and lovers and family, and an old enemy has become something much more.

But power demands responsibility, and world-changers must always pay a price. That time is now.

Reading This Week

 

A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in AmericaA Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in America by Allyson Hobbs

Between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, countless African Americans passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and community. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile, a separation from one racial identity and the leap into another. This revelatory history of passing explores the possibilities and challenges that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions. It also tells a tale of loss.

 

Around the Web

How to do a book review – What do you think?  What do you like to read in a review?

Why Americans don’t read foreign fiction – I’m finding lots of good books in translation but it takes some searching.