Sunday Week in Review

/ posted in: Reading

Posted This Week

Cold Magic – It is magic versus the industrial revolution in an alternate history version of England.

Dress Shop of Dreams – Magical realism

Afro – Vegan  – Great recipes and book recommendations

Almost Perfect – An autistic teenager decides to win Westminster with his neighbor’s Poodle

The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks – A five star biography that shows that she was more than the lady who didn’t give up her seat on the bus

The Tale of a UFO – Sewing actually happened here


Added to My TBR list This Week

This Side of HomeThis Side of Home by Renée Watson

“Identical twins Nikki and Maya have been on the same page for everything—friends, school, boys and starting off their adult lives at a historically African-American college. But as their neighborhood goes from rough-and-tumble to up-and-coming, suddenly filled with pretty coffee shops and boutiques, Nikki is thrilled while Maya feels like their home is slipping away. Suddenly, the sisters who had always shared everything must confront their dissenting feelings on the importance of their ethnic and cultural identities and, in the process, learn to separate themselves from the long shadow of their identity as twins.”

The Quaker CaféThe Quaker Café by Brenda Bevan Remmes
“When Liz Hoole, a free-spirited liberal from the Midwest, marries into a conservative Quaker family, she knows that raising children in compliance with Quaker values will be challenging. Twenty-five years later, she still feels like she’s falling short of expectations. Fortunately, her faith and her friends in the small, rural North Carolina town of Cedar Branch keep her strong.

After her best friend’s politically powerful father dies, Liz stumbles upon secrets from the past that threaten to unravel the current harmony in Cedar Branch, a town with a history of racial tension. As she researches more and eavesdrops on gossip at the Quaker Café, where everyone meets each morning, Liz soon discovers the truth about an injustice that she cannot reveal to anyone—not even her husband.”

Lost & FoundLost & Found by Brooke Davis

Millie Bird is a seven-year-old girl who always wears red wellington boots to match her red, curly hair. But one day, Millie’s mum leaves her alone beneath the Ginormous Women’s underwear rack in a department store, and doesn’t come back.

Agatha Pantha is an eighty-two-year-old woman who hasn’t left her home since her husband died. Instead, she fills the silence by yelling at passers-by, watching loud static on TV, and maintaining a strict daily schedule. Until the day Agatha spies a little girl across the street.

Karl the Touch Typist is eighty-seven years old and once typed love letters with his fingers on to his wife’s skin. He sits in a nursing home, knowing that somehow he must find a way for life to begin again. In a moment of clarity and joy, he escapes.

Together, Millie, Agatha and Karl set out to find Millie’s mum. Along the way, they will discover that the young can be wise, that old age is not the same as death, and that breaking the rules once in a while might just be the key to a happy life.”

Added to read some books set in Australia which I haven’t done recently.

A Time to DanceA Time to Dance by Padma Venkatraman

“Veda, a classical dance prodigy in India, lives and breathes dance—so when an accident leaves her a below-knee amputee, her dreams are shattered. For a girl who’s grown used to receiving applause for her dance prowess and flexibility, adjusting to a prosthetic leg is painful and humbling. But Veda refuses to let her disability rob her of her dreams, and she starts all over again, taking beginner classes with the youngest dancers. Then Veda meets Govinda, a young man who approaches dance as a spiritual pursuit. As their relationship deepens, Veda reconnects with the world around her, and begins to discover who she is and what dance truly means to her.”

I think will be interesting to read after Pointe.


 Reading This Week

PointePointe by Brandy Colbert
“She’s eating again, dating guys who are almost appropriate, and well on her way to becoming an elite ballet dancer. But when her oldest friend, Donovan, returns home after spending four long years with his kidnapper, Theo starts reliving memories about his abduction—and his abductor.”

 

Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970Freedom’s Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970 by Lynne Olson

“Freedom’s Daughters includes portraits of more than sixty women — many until now forgotten and some never before written about — from the key figures (Ida B. Wells, Eleanor Roosevelt, Ella Baker, and Septima Clark, among others) to some of the smaller players who represent the hundreds of women who each came forth to do her own small part and who together ultimately formed the mass movements that made the difference. Freedom’s Daughters puts a human face on the civil rights struggle — and shows that that face was often female.”

I found this book after seeing the movie Selma and being curious about Diane Nash.  She’s a major part of the movie but I’d never heard of her.  I know that women were a major part of the civil right movement and often not treated well.  That was a major point of the Rosa Parks biography too so I’m interested in this book.

All summaries from Goodreads