The Cake Fairies

/ posted in: Book ReviewFoodies ReadReading The Cake Fairies The Cake Fairies by Isabella May
Pages: 397
Genres: Fiction
Published by Independently Published
Format: eBook
Source: Book Tour, From author/publisher
Setting: England

1960's Somerset is no fun for cousins Polly and Annabelle Williams. Mourning their non-existent love lives, and the mundanity of village life, their only pleasure is baking - until a chance encounter has them magically transported to the bright lights of London... in 2019!

Promised a chance of love, first they must teach the people of the future about the simpler pleasures of life by becoming Cake Fairies. Over the course of a year they set off on a delectable tour of the UK, dropping off cakes in the most unexpected of places and replacing the lure of technology with much sweeter temptations.

But will their philanthropical endeavours lead them to everlasting love? Or will they discover you can't have your cake and eat it?

The Cake Fairies is the fifth novel by fantastical foodie author, Isabella May.

Goodreads

I jumped on the chance to read this book because of the title.  I love books about food and books with fairies.  Why not combine them?

I loved the idea that Polly and Annabelle meet their fairy godmother who is frustrated with them.  She has set them up to meet many good husbands but their lack of adventurous spirits has derailed every plan.  Now it is time to do something drastic.  

They are good bakers who are brought forward to 2019 to spread joy through random gifts of cake.  I always like time travel books where people need to figure out a new time.  I especially like it when people move into the future since that is a rarer storyline.  This book did make me a bit salty though.  The problem that they are brought forward to combat is that people spend all their time on mobile devices instead of talking to the people around them.  The fairy godmother wants people to look away from their screens. 

Holy Introvert Nightmare!  I am old enough to remember when people didn’t have screens to occupy themselves.  People didn’t just go around talking to random strangers.  We just had books and newspapers to hide behind.  Besides, what do you think people are doing when they are typing on their phone?  Communicating!  Why would we ever want to go back to a world where I have to wait until we get home and can check the encyclopedia to prove to my husband that I was right about whatever we might be discussing when I can google it in the moment?  Oh, and by the way, I read this ebook on my iPad in part while sitting in a restaurant apparently being antisocial and contributing to the downfall of society.  /rant, maybe.

So anyway, the idea that this utopia that they thought they were building equals my idea of a crushing defeat of civilization may have altered my enjoyment of the book just a bit.  I was sassy while reading especially when there was a reveal that the reason one character wasn’t nice was because her mother used to make cake for her father and not for the children.  Her mother loved her father more than she loved her children.  That’s the way I always thought things were supposed to work.  I didn’t think it was cause for alarm.  /rant, seriously this time.

If you are ok with the premise, it could be a cute, light read with a little bit of romance.