Non traditional nonfiction

/ posted in: Reading

Nonfiction-November-2015

Nontraditional Nonfiction: This week we will be focusing on the nontraditional side of reading nonfiction. Nonfiction comes in many forms. There are the traditional hardcover or paperback print books, of course, but then you also have e-books, audiobooks, illustrated and graphic nonfiction, oversized folios, miniatures, internet publishing, and enhanced books complete with artifacts. So many choices! Do you find yourself drawn to or away from nontraditional nonfiction? Do you enjoy some nontraditional formats, but not others? Perhaps you have recommendations for readers who want to dive into nontraditional formats.  We want to hear all about it this week!  


When I think of nontraditional ways to enjoy nonfiction I think of

audiobooks

and

continuing the discussion in another format


Audiobooks

About half of the audiobooks I listen to are nonfiction. Here are some of my favorites.

Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New AmericaDevil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America by Gilbert King
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

 

I recommend this one all the time. You need to get through the beginning section about the life of Thurgood Marshall. That’s interesting but what you really want to get into the story of this rape investigation in Florida in the 1940s. It is stranger and more horrifying than any fiction you’ve ever read.
My review


 

In a Sunburned CountryIn a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Any book by Bill Bryson is going to be excellent but this one about a trip to Australia is laugh out loud funny. I like to listen to his books on audio because he narrates them so well.


 

Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of NepalLittle Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal by Conor Grennan
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

There have been a few times when the husband and I both listen to the same audiobook. We have very different tastes so it is rare to find one that I think we would both like. This fit the bill.
My review


 

Moby-Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of ThemMoby-Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is just a good book. You should listen to it. You’ll learn a lot of science but be entertained chasing four bath animals around the world.


 

Continuing The Discussion

Everyday SexismEveryday Sexism by Laura Bates

The Everyday Sexism project started as a website and morphed into a book. The discussion is continuing on Twitter at @everydaysexism.


 

Free-Range Kids: Giving Our Children the Freedom We Had Without Going Nuts with WorryFree-Range Kids: Giving Our Children the Freedom We Had Without Going Nuts with Worry by Lenore Skenazy
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is about website/book combination. Check out Free Range Kids.


 

Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual RevolutionHeadscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution by Mona Eltahawy
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Author Mona Eltahawy (@monaeltahawy) on Twitter has a great feed with news about feminism in the Muslim community. She is also traveling so extensively around the world because of this book that I often worry that she isn’t getting enough sleep.


 

A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating OpportunityA Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I listened to this audiobook about gauging the effectiveness of nonprofits. It is very good. There is also now a companion TV short series that shows many of the nonprofits that they discuss in the book.